UNICA

A forum for sharing views on the art of film, video and AV sequence making as well as on competitions, judging and festivals.
Dave Watterson

UNICA

Post by Dave Watterson » Wed Aug 14, 2002 12:20 pm

The last week of August is when UNICA is holding its annual festival. This
year it is in Luxembourg - full details on the IAC website - next year Cracow,
then 2004 in Germany.

The week-long festival is made up of programmes chosen by each member country.
Some countries simply take the top films from their own competitions. Other
(including the UK) choose films which they hope will have an international
appeal. Each nation's programme lasts between 60 and 75 minutes maximum.

Our own AN's epic CLIP JOINT is part of the UK entry this year along with
a group of other fine films of different types.

You can go and see them ... UNICA screenings are free. Get yourself over
to Luxembourg and give UK some support! Our programme is likely to run on
the afternoon of Tuesday 27th along with programmes from Iran and Sweden
- both countries that have produced some great amateur movies recently.

If you do go ... say hello to the 6'4" (1.95m) bearded Scotsman who might
be me ...

Dave

AN

Re: UNICA

Post by AN » Wed Aug 14, 2002 2:18 pm

"Dave Watterson" <webmaster@theiac.org.uk> wrote:
If you do go ... say hello to the 6'4" (1.95m) bearded Scotsman >who might
be me ...
Ah Dave, so you are 6'4" when in Scotland, and 1.95m when in
Luxenburg. Bet you 'stand taller' when 6/4 than when 1.95.

Oh please bring back pints, bushels and pecks.

Albert....somewhere in the pecking order.

Dave Watterson

Re: UNICA

Post by Dave Watterson » Fri Aug 16, 2002 10:41 am

Yes, it is strange. I have no problem with decimal currency, though could
equally work with half-crowns and thruppeny bits if necessary. But using
metres, kilos and degrees Celsius does not come easy.


It seems to be one of the generation markers.

I recall one such marker when I was young was that older folks knew how to
change a gramophone needle, while younger ones could fit a new stylus to
the pick-up when necessary! Now both are redundant in the age of CDs and
MP3s.

I guess the good part is that the music is separate from the means of reproduction.
In the same way the art of movie making has little to do with whatever technology
is used to create it.

We focus way too much on the means and not enough on the output.

Dave (Philosophical) McWatterson

AN

Re: UNICA

Post by AN » Sat Aug 17, 2002 1:55 pm

"Dave Watterson" <webmaster@theiac.org.uk> wrote:
I recall one such marker when I was young was that older folks >knew how
to change a gramophone needle
Oooerr, where does that put me? I change 78 needles quite often in order
to play my collection of old 78s on a 1930s radiogram!

Albert...getting wound up.

malcolm whiteley

Re: UNICA

Post by malcolm whiteley » Sat Aug 17, 2002 2:23 pm

Mmmmmmmmmmm!
Whats a 78s. Can't find that one in the manual I'm reading.
Mal. (44 23 9)

Brian Hazelden

Re: UNICA

Post by Brian Hazelden » Sat Aug 17, 2002 4:44 pm

I was born in '33.

In '78 I was 45.

Is this a record?

(Not true, and not even original)

But did you know that a 33rpm record played at 45rpm is exactly one octave
higher and played at 78 is two octaves higher?

Brian

AN

Re: UNICA

Post by AN » Sun Aug 18, 2002 7:22 am

"malcolm whiteley" <malcolmwhiteley@hotmail.com> wrote:
Mmmmmmmmmmm!
You eating marmite again, Mal?
Whats a 78s.
It's like a CD but smaller in diameter. The grooves are a bit smaller too,
as is the hole in the centre. HMV had a pet dog
that was partly deaf. He used to stick his ear in the horn of the gramophone
to hear em.
Dyer know what a gramophone is? That's a machine once used to destroy 78s.
Can't find that one in the manual I'm reading.
Look on page 78.
Mal. (44 23 9)
Albert ( no number, just numb)

AN

Re: UNICA

Post by AN » Sun Aug 18, 2002 7:32 am

"Brian Hazelden" <brian_hazelden@lineone.net> wrote:
But did you know that a 33rpm record played at 45rpm is exactly >one octave
higher and played at 78 is two octaves higher?
To play a note an octave higher requires a doubling in frequency.
Therefore to do this on a record one must track at twice the
original speed, which requires twice the RPM.
So 33rpm has do be doubled to 66rpm. To raise yet another octave
requires a doubling again to 132 rpm. Each octave goes thus..
...33/66/132/264/528

Albert...all doubled up.

AN

Re: UNICA

Post by AN » Sun Aug 18, 2002 7:38 am

"Brian Hazelden" <brian_hazelden@lineone.net> wrote:
But did you know that a 33rpm record played at 45rpm is exactly >one octave
higher and played at 78 is two octaves higher?
To play an octave higher requires a doubling in frequency.
Surely a 33rpm record would have to be played at 66rpm
in order to attain this? To double yet again the rpm should again be doubled
up to 66 x 2 = 132rpm?

Albert...all doubled up.

malcolm whiteley

Re: UNICA

Post by malcolm whiteley » Sun Aug 18, 2002 8:44 am

"Dyer know what a gramophone is? That's a machine once used to destroy 78s."
Gotcha! So they replaced the gramaphone with the CD and DVD writer, as
these seem to do the same job.
Page 78. Place vinyl disc in sink of warm water, lift out when disc is soft
and flexible. Bring sides of disc up to form bowl shape. When cool, fill
with compost and place tulip bulbs in.
YOU MUST BE JOKING.
Mal. (still sucking on the Malt and codliver oil)

Dave Watterson

Taste

Post by Dave Watterson » Sun Aug 18, 2002 8:59 am

Malt and cod-liver oil ... oh, happy memories. Now and then I still buy a
jar and gloop it down by the tablespoon. I sometimes get those cod-liver
oil capsules ... bite them open to suck the oil then chew reflectively for
a few moments on the gelatin.

So ... how can we get that sort of taste into movies? (We can worry about
the other kind of taste later.) How do we present evocative tastes, scents
and textures?

They are important because those senses seem to connect to our brains in
a more direct, primitive manner and have a more profound emotional kick than
sight and sound do. Since much of what the movies do best involves emotional
impact this is important.

McDave of the Marmite and McAllan

AN

Re: Taste

Post by AN » Sun Aug 18, 2002 2:11 pm

"Dave Watterson" <webmaster@theiac.org.uk> wrote:
Malt and cod-liver oil ... oh, happy memories.
I sometimes get those cod-liver oil capsules ...
I take those too...fer me ol squeaking joints.
bite them open to suck the oil then chew reflectively
for a few moments on the gelatin. So ...
how can we get that sort of taste into movies?
By coating DV tape with gelatine? :-)
How do we present evocative tastes, scents and textures?
For textures get yourself a good lighting cameraman.
For scents and taste wait until humans can be plugged into
the new scent/taste sockets fitted under the arm rest in cinema seats, or
into home projectors, added S/T outlet.

Sony will market a camera with a tiny intake fan to sample the
scent and a tiny slot to feed in yer roast beef which you require
to be sampled. The problem is stopping the fan noise being
picked up by the built in mic.
Fancy, roast beef digitised! Yummy yum yum, just cannot wait to
have a byte.
Timelines will have extra lines for taste/scent obviously...you can alter
the intensity by going to 'taste/scent effects pop up window.
The scent can have 'breeze' amount added, or 'wafted' effect
(usefull for Bisto adverts)
Taste can be varied sweeter or sourer, much as we can already
vary brightness/contrast of the picture.
So much so, that if you import the taste of sugur say, onto your
'T' timeline and then add the maximum sourness,
the sugar begins to taste like vinegar.
The best taste/scent editors will have to learn how to subtly
change the parameters as the actors move on the sets etc.

Premier (addition v8) is being 'beeta(root) tested. One bug apparently,
is differentiating between onion/garlic and coffee/cocoa.
Also, unless you buy the very best NLE, most spirits seem to taste the same,
but breatherlizer technolodgy is being used to overcome this, so I'm told.

Albert.....a Bisto kid. Mmmmmmmm.

Ned Cordery

Re: Taste

Post by Ned Cordery » Sun Aug 18, 2002 3:03 pm

"Dave Watterson" <webmaster@theiac.org.uk> wrote:
Malt and cod-liver oil ... oh, happy memories. Now and then I still buy
a
jar and gloop it down by the tablespoon. I sometimes get those cod-liver
oil capsules ... bite them open to suck the oil then chew reflectively for
a few moments on the gelatin.
This is my idea of gastronomic hell. How I hated all that stuff. Right up
there with tapioca and sago.
So ... how can we get that sort of taste into movies? (We can worry about
the other kind of taste later.) How do we present evocative tastes, scents
and textures?

They are important because those senses seem to connect to our brains in
a more direct, primitive manner and have a more profound emotional kick
than
sight and sound do. Since much of what the movies do best involves emotional
impact this is important.

McDave of the Marmite and McAllan
Have you seen the movie "Tortilla Soup" if not rush out and rent it. It brings
the beauty of food to the screen and is also a very fine movie.

Ned Cordery
>

Dave Watterson

Re: Taste

Post by Dave Watterson » Sun Aug 18, 2002 10:47 pm

I have not yet seen "Tortilla Soup" ... it opens in the UK on 23rd August,
but I do know the film on which it is based, "Eat, Drink, Man, Woman" which
is fascinating on the preparation of food as well as the emotional strife
of the chef's family.

"Tampopo" said a lot about the preparation of noodles and included some great
food philosophy. "La Grande Bouffe" had people eating (and farting) themselves
to death. "Babette's Feast" and "Big Night" make a lot of the preparation
again. "Like Water for Chocolate" had interesting ideas. The saccharine "Chocolat"
caught a fraction of the magical power of food as contained in the book (definitely
one to read rather than watch).

Then there is that scene in "Tom Jones" where they devour chicken, and a
newish short-short "Passion Fruit" by Jack Sekowski which has just been award
a prize from the Cotswold Festival (http://www.cotswoldfilmvideofest.co.uk/)
...

Any amateur films we can think of?

Dave the Drooling

Ned Cordery

Re: Taste

Post by Ned Cordery » Sun Aug 18, 2002 11:43 pm

"Dave Watterson" <webmaster@theiac.org.uk> wrote:
I have not yet seen "Tortilla Soup" ... it opens in the UK on 23rd August,
but I do know the film on which it is based, "Eat, Drink, Man, Woman" which
is fascinating on the preparation of food as well as the emotional strife
of the chef's family.
I have seen both and they seem to have copied shot for shot and it actually
works this time. The casting is excellent.

Ned Cordery
>

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