Article on IAC

IAC General Discussions
Mark Anthony Games
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 8:08 am

Article on IAC

Post by Mark Anthony Games » Mon May 04, 2015 9:33 am

Mark Anthony Games here:

I just wanted to say a couple of words regarding my article posted on the IAC website:
http://www.theiac.org.uk/news/where-the ... dwell.html

I mean no offence to any person or society involved with the running and organisation of the IAC / BIAFF. I was simply posed a question and gave an answer. Film-makers above all others should see the beauty in individual minds and seek to abolish the collective thought. Freedom of expression should be the only 'God' of the writer & film-maker. We seek to make something to stop people in their tracks and pause a while. In doing so we should also accept that upon us shall rain confusion, insult, jubilation, support, aggression, praise, condemnation, prizes and disqualifications. With every film we make we invite scrutiny by default. So, we must embrace this and take it into our bosom like a long lost loved one. We must not senselessly defend our view in ignorance and refusal to accept a viewers view as different to our intentions. Art is something that is open to interpretation and offers no concrete meaning and film is no different.

I have the utmost respect for the collective organisation of the IAC and BIAFF and any other letters that spell out more factions of the fore-mentioned institutes. I am an outsider, not affiliated to a club. In truth I was probably only bought in to the action as I was considered young. My talents are limited but my ambition and hunger are further out than that hunk of junk currently looking at Saturn!

So in this rather poetic way, I have stated that I used my voice, as we all should. Never should we dismantle our words to fit in delicate ears. We should launch them like a nuclear state into the minds of everyone. To many people are sitting back surviving life when it should be lived. To many words and actions shelved in fear of what might manifest. People, we have but one life and life is a terminal illness. So embrace it, dance with it, shout, sing and make love to it but never hold your self back in fear. Fear keeps a life in stasis, and you will find your self in old age looking back with nothing but regrets and wasted opportunities.

So to conclude:
If have upset anyone by writing this article, though it was not my intention, i am sorry

Peace, Love & Light

Mark Anthony Games
Last edited by Mark Anthony Games on Mon May 04, 2015 10:35 am, edited 1 time in total.

Michael Slowe
Posts: 609
Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2007 4:24 pm

Re: Article on IAC

Post by Michael Slowe » Mon May 04, 2015 10:24 am

Why do people get upset by criticism? You'll all find that by the time you reach the age of 80 you'll be immune from its effects, I have!

Mark Anthony Games
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 8:08 am

Re: Article on IAC

Post by Mark Anthony Games » Mon May 04, 2015 10:33 am

Michael Slowe wrote:Why do people get upset by criticism? You'll all find that by the time you reach the age of 80 you'll be immune from its effects, I have!

I welcome criticism, but nonconstructive rants I do not like. This was just posted to say sorry to any person who may read this in a way that suggests I am attacking or insulting BIAFF, which was not my intention.

User avatar
TimStannard
Posts: 905
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: Surrey

Re: Article on IAC

Post by TimStannard » Mon May 04, 2015 2:52 pm

I do not see how any offence could be taken by anyone reading your article. If anything I would suggest it failed to make any real criticisms, despite being eloquently written.

Your main point appears to be "To make new friends one cannot simply expect the others to step into your world; you must also step into theirs." which I think is something that clubs need to learn to address more than the IAC (and, of course, club membership makes up a large part of the IAC). It is the single most important statement in your article, in my opinion.

But you then suggest: "This means embracing all that new fancy technology that we all claim to not understand and are slightly afraid off." It is not clear to me whether you mean technology in terms of making use of the various ways of communicating via websites, social media,and forums; sharing our films via online services; collaborating online; or the technology of film making itself (cameras and associated equipment, editing).

If the last case, I think you're barking up the wrong tree as most clubs have at least one early adopter with funds a plenty which means most of us do actually get to play with this stuff eqrlier than we might otherwise.

With the exception of on-line collaboration, the IAC (primarily through Dave Watterson and Peter Kidman) continues to push the advantages of websites, social media and sharing films online. The "problem" is that many clubs do not have the willingness or the skills to maintain a good online presence. This is because the sites are often maintained by people who are perhaps a bit old school in their thinking and still treat a website as a printed version of their newsletter. Having won the IAC website trophy a few years back, our own site has suffered for another reason - it became too dependent on one person who, due to other pressures in his life, has been unable to react as quickly as one might like - leaving us with a very much out of date site in both looks and content. On the other hand, I now post at least once a week on a Facebook site for the club and this is now the "go to" place for current information. Sadly only about three members access it, with most reluctant to join FB. We also have a Twitter feed that about two people read.

If we are really to make progress we need not only to attract younger people, but we need these younger people to run the publicity and communications.

The only place I can see the IAC being slow to react to changing technology is the inability to project higher definition (up to 4K) with surround sound at BIAFF. The issue here is that the IAC would probably have to hire equipment (thus increasing costs) and I'm guessing only a small percentage of entrants would benefit from it. However, surely it is part of the IAC's objectives to improve standards.

Of course I may have totally missed what you were getting at when you cited technology as an issue, so please feel free to respond, ideally with specific examples.

On the other hand (and this has been discussed here on more than one occasion) certain types of film and types of content that might be submitted by younger film makers is often snubbed by old school club members and judges - usually through ignorance and a refusal to accept changing or challenging styles. Again I believe this is a criticism that should be levelled at clubs (or certain members of certain clubs) than at the IAC which at least makes an effort to ensure a degree of standardisation among judges.

But the only way we are really going to create an IAC that attracts younger people is to get more younger people running the show. It is great that John Roberts has been co-opted onto the Council and that you have become involved by presenting and judging at BIAFF, but the simple fact is that most younger people have an awful lot going on in their lives (young families, mortgages, work) and when they do have spare time, they'd rather spend it making films than running organisations for other film makers - which is why clubs and organisations up and down the country are run by old men and women.

Going back to your "To make new friends one cannot simply expect the others to step into your world; you must also step into theirs." we therefore need to find a way that we can get the old people with time and enthusiasm to step into the world of the younger film maker and act as some sort of "channel" or "enabler" without being judgemental and without trying to be a youngster!

As an aside, whilst I think your suggestion that "We seek to make something to stop people in their tracks and pause a while." is laudable, I don't see that a film needs to do that in order to be valid. A simple record of events, told in an interesting way can be just as valid as can a simple entertainment. Would you agree?
Tim
Proud to be an amateur film maker - I do it for the love of it

Mark Anthony Games
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 8:08 am

Re: Article on IAC

Post by Mark Anthony Games » Mon May 04, 2015 3:53 pm

As an aside, whilst I think your suggestion that "We seek to make something to stop people in their tracks and pause a while." is laudable, I don't see that a film needs to do that in order to be valid. A simple record of events, told in an interesting way can be just as valid as can a simple entertainment. Would you agree?
My point sir, A valid simple record of events needs have someone watch it. If they stop to look then you have your audience. if they fail to be inspired to watch they will walk away. So the film-maker is still trying to make people stop and watch.

I also agree with all your points above and I guess they are the ones that I failed to make in my write up. The most common method of awareness today for me is twitter & Facebook. I have learned about so many events and competitions via this medium. I have seen no posts in film groups from the BIAFF facebook page in either the run up to the event or during. If people do not know it is there then they will not go there. BIAFF needs to post in film-makers groups and other such related groups on FB to say 'Hey check us out, come along, enter a film and be excellent to each other. Twitter is exactly the same and it is this technology I am talking about not film-making equipment. I had about 12 people over the weekend tell me they don't do that tweeting thing as it is a bit strange!

I have not been asked to offer solutions, just a look at what I thought was lacking. I also think it is more important to get younger people attending the festival, i would not say that they are required to help run it. I have attended about 30 odd festivals and all of them have a wide variety of ages,so not sure why BIAFF does not. People will make the time for an event if it appeals. It appeals to me because I learnt that the people of BIAFF are epic and awesome, but i learned that by being there. Build it and they will come (Costner 1896)

User avatar
TimStannard
Posts: 905
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: Surrey

Re: Article on IAC

Post by TimStannard » Mon May 04, 2015 6:58 pm

Mark Anthony Games wrote:
As an aside, whilst I think your suggestion that "We seek to make something to stop people in their tracks and pause a while." is laudable, I don't see that a film needs to do that in order to be valid. A simple record of events, told in an interesting way can be just as valid as can a simple entertainment. Would you agree?
My point sir, A valid simple record of events needs have someone watch it. If they stop to look then you have your audience. if they fail to be inspired to watch they will walk away. So the film-maker is still trying to make people stop and watch.
OK. I'll conceed that (with the notable exception that sometimes we have a captive audience - not just at Festivals, but also where people are seeking information)
Mark Anthony Games wrote: I also agree with all your points above and I guess they are the ones that I failed to make in my write up. The most common method of awareness today for me is twitter & Facebook. I have learned about so many events and competitions via this medium. I have seen no posts in film groups from the BIAFF facebook page in either the run up to the event or during. If people do not know it is there then they will not go there. BIAFF needs to post in film-makers groups and other such related groups on FB to say 'Hey check us out, come along, enter a film and be excellent to each other. Twitter is exactly the same and it is this technology I am talking about not film-making equipment. I had about 12 people over the weekend tell me they don't do that tweeting thing as it is a bit strange!
I have to admit that whilst I (rarely) tweet and follow a few people I really struggle with Twitter. I often use as an example of the benefits a Cardiff based film makers I know (only via film making forums) who uses it to shout out for crew for jobs (eg "Soundie and Grip needed for shoot, Newport, Wednesday, paid"). I can see this as really useful. But I only follow a few people (36) and generally there is too much posted for me to keep up - at least if I don't want to be looking at my phone every minute. I'd happily follow you (because at the moment you're an interesting guy, very busy making films and full of enthusiasm but I suspect your tweets would be lost in the melee. How do people manage their Twitter feeds?
Mark Anthony Games wrote: I have not been asked to offer solutions, just a look at what I thought was lacking. I also think it is more important to get younger people attending the festival, i would not say that they are required to help run it.
No, but would you not agree that in order for it to be more relevant to younger people, we need input from younger people? And if they're going to advise they're probably best placed to do it if they help out from within. Aside from the means of publicity, what do you think is wrong with BIAFF? I would suggest (as a previously young attendee, before John Roberts and you came along) that there is nothing much wrong with the idea of all these film shows (although we might improve projection/sound facilities). I've mentioned in another thread, I'd prefer a bit more time to discuss the films between sessions. But for me (and for you?) the trips out to visit local sites are not in the slightest bit appealing. In other words the extra-curricular stuff is a bit like a weekend coach trip for the local Darby and Joans club.
A trip to the local nightclubs would definitely not be my cup of tea either, but evening entertainment by Carnival of Thieves might appeal :)
Mark Anthony Games wrote: I have attended about 30 odd festivals and all of them have a wide variety of ages,so not sure why BIAFF does not.

see above, maybe?
Mark Anthony Games wrote: Build it and they will come (Costner 1896)
Blimey, his plastic surgeon must be good!
Tim
Proud to be an amateur film maker - I do it for the love of it

Mark Anthony Games
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 8:08 am

Re: Article on IAC

Post by Mark Anthony Games » Mon May 04, 2015 7:28 pm

How do people manage their Twitter feeds?

I allocate at least an hour a day to Networking, this means tweeting to and replying to directors, writers and actors. I do this in the hope it might lead to an acting job or similar. I have landed 16 auditions this way so it does work sometimes. People love people that shovel coal up their ass to fire their ego! The real benifit of twitter is that anyone can see it so sometimes your link can be 'Trending' with out you knowing. One of my blogs suddenly got 382 views in five hours, turns out BBC News tweeted the link.
No, but would you not agree that in order for it to be more relevant to younger people, we need input from younger people? And if they're going to advise they're probably best placed to do it if they help out from within. Aside from the means of publicity, what do you think is wrong with BIAFF?
I think the current members of BIAFF are doing nothing wrong. It is a fantastic institute and putting on impressive events. it is not my idea to get young people involved, I was just asked to write why there are not more young people. I have no desire to either have more or ban the youth. BIAFF if perfect, but who will carry on the legacy in 10/15 or 20 years?

A trip to the local nightclubs would definitely not be my cup of tea either, but evening entertainment by Carnival of Thieves might appeal :)

Me too, hate nightclubs and I am not a big drinker. The meal was great but you could only really talk to those on your table. So maybe a private function room with a bar, light live music or even guest speakers. They could be actors, film-makers, producers, singers..... anything.

Mark Anthony Games wrote: Build it and they will come (Costner 1896)
Blimey, his plastic surgeon must be good![/quote]

Yeah I was just messing with this one.

Look, I love BIAFF and have no issues or complaints. I have no idea why they were so keen for me to be involved. I have a moderate ability to write and make films but am far from special and am certainly not the chosen one :lol:

User avatar
TimStannard
Posts: 905
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: Surrey

Re: Article on IAC

Post by TimStannard » Mon May 04, 2015 8:49 pm

Mark Anthony Games wrote: Look, I love BIAFF and have no issues or complaints.
Totally understood (and didn't read any complaints into what you'd written)
Mark Anthony Games wrote: I have no idea why they were so keen for me to be involved.
My guess would be they (we?) are so desperate to get anyone under 60 on side in an attempt to have a future.
You just happened to be in the right/wrong place at the right/wrong time, depending on how you look at it.

BTW BIAFF is just the festival it is not an organisation. The organisation (which organises BIAFF) is the IAC - The Film and Video Institute (IAC stands for Institute of Amateur Cinematographers but we're not allowed to call it that because amateur has connotations of "poor quality" in some quarters and "Cinematography" sounds too much like cine film, but of course this is now back in vogue as everyone wants to be a cinematographer rather than a videographer. Oh, how fickle is our language.
Tim
Proud to be an amateur film maker - I do it for the love of it

User avatar
fraught
Posts: 535
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 11:54 pm
Location: Basingstoke
Contact:

Re: Article on IAC

Post by fraught » Mon May 04, 2015 10:58 pm

I liked your article, and don't see what people would be offended by.

Getting on to the young audience debate, this is something i've tried to do for a very long time! I'm sure if you browse these forums you'll see comments of mine championing the need for newer blood, and newer directions.

I've been a member of the IAC since i was about 14, before the internet! ;-) I think i found an add for the IAC in a Film Making Magazine i had bought. I only joined at the start so that i could take care of the music licence. Over time, i felt that the people running the annual competition and the magazine were just a bunch of old 'uns and didn't care for the sort of films that i wanted to make or watch. I wrote a couple of articles for the Youth page in the magazine, which didn't seem to last very long. I was the first to win the 'Best Youth Action Movie of the Year' award... and sadly i was the last. I moaned a bit, but never really did anything.

Then i met a woman, got married, had kids, etc... next minute i know a few years had passed and i hadn't made anything! I started to read the magazine again, and i haven't looked back since... but things in the IAC hadn't changed much during my time away from the camera, maybe they had got worse? Then i met Dave & Jan Watterson. Their enthusiasm for the film makers, regardless of age, colour, location, had filled me with just enough passion to maybe want to do something about the ailing membership of the IAC. I wanted it to thrive.

I originally set up the IAC Facebook Page back in 2008 i think, i could see how things were taking off via this site and wanted the IAC to be prepared. I added Dave to the admin of the page, and now just pipe up now and then... Dave pretty much runs that show now, and really well too!

I also set up an IAC Vimeo Group (https://vimeo.com/groups/IAC) back in 2008 as well. I did these as i wanted the future of the IAC to flourish with the new trends and hope for them to find further membership.

I'm in the process of setting up a Twitter account for the IAC too... i've had some great success via this site over FB. It's a great tool, and i think used well, it'll work a treat.

In my opinion... one of the quickest ways of getting membership in and recognition is to ensure that all films can be sent in over the internet... no need for Hard Media these days. With competition entries coming in this way, it would mean that judging could be done in new ways that don't require them to be in one place at the same time. It would also mean that the use of sites like FilmFreeWay, etc, could be used.

I'm not giving up on the old girl just yet... and i'm glad that people like Mark and John are joining the ranks to inject some fresh ideas and opinions.
Only Boring People Get Bored
http://www.fraught.net

Brian Saberton
Posts: 340
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2007 7:00 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Article on IAC

Post by Brian Saberton » Wed May 06, 2015 12:59 pm

Mark, I don't think that there is anything in your article that could cause offence. The vexed question of how to get young people more involved has been debated within the IAC since the 1980's at least. There have been many initiatives over the years by a number of people so I don't think it is for the want of trying. I know that David Newman has worked very hard to attract more entries into BIAFF from young film makers with quite a degree of success and in recent years, particularly at BIAFF in Bedford in 2014, I recall that there was a relatively large number of young people attending the Saturday screening of the youth films, so maybe the poor response this year was just a one off. Unfortunately I'm afraid that attracting young people into joining the IAC, or helping to run festivals etc, seems to be one of those issues for which there is no easy answer.
Brian Saberton

User avatar
TimStannard
Posts: 905
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: Surrey

Re: Article on IAC

Post by TimStannard » Wed May 06, 2015 5:19 pm

Ahem, I should also have mentioned Geoff (fraught) as one of the younger members who does a lot to promote BIAFF and puts a lot into it. Sorry for my neglect, Geoff!
Tim
Proud to be an amateur film maker - I do it for the love of it

User avatar
fraught
Posts: 535
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 11:54 pm
Location: Basingstoke
Contact:

Re: Article on IAC

Post by fraught » Wed May 06, 2015 5:57 pm

I wasn't looking for praise Tim.... But I'll take it anyway. ;-)
Only Boring People Get Bored
http://www.fraught.net

User avatar
Dave Watterson
Posts: 1646
Joined: Sun Jan 28, 2007 11:11 pm
Location: Bath, England
Contact:

Re: Article on IAC

Post by Dave Watterson » Wed May 06, 2015 9:29 pm

All the regulars on here are great enthusiasts... even if some of us may be getting on in years we are young at heart !

Brian Saberton
Posts: 340
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2007 7:00 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Article on IAC

Post by Brian Saberton » Thu May 07, 2015 5:52 pm

I'm sure it's something to do with being film enthusiasts Dave!
Brian Saberton

Michael Slowe
Posts: 609
Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2007 4:24 pm

Re: Article on IAC

Post by Michael Slowe » Fri May 08, 2015 6:17 pm

Fraught, (nice to have finally met you by the way), I must take you up on something that you wrote a few days ago. Something about not needing hard copies of films any more. I couldn't disagree more strongly, although, commercially, I know I'm fighting a losing battle. If having everything on line means that films would always be watched on a computer, then I think that is terrible. We take great trouble in making sure that our pictures are good and they look best on a decent size screen (40 to 50 inch TV). I think however that you will say that modern TV's can screen material straight off the web, in which case you have a point.

If the proverbial 'little old lady' wants to see your film, will she be able or willing to download it? I think not, she will want you to hand her a disc in a nice case. I do realise that most cinemas now get their films on a small handy drive for digital projection or, increasingly, down the line. So, commercially, Apple have won, discs are on the way out. For us and other small production outfits, a disc is still essential in my opinion.

Post Reply