Adobe Premiere Elements 7

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Roy

Adobe Premiere Elements 7

Post by Roy » Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:27 pm

I am half way thru a Trial of elements 7 and am finding it quite easy to use the basics. One thing puzzles me though. With Premiere 6.5 I can export the time line directly to a DVD recorder. Which is the quickest way I know to make a DVD. In fact it takes just as long as the clip takes to play. Unfortunately I can find no way of doing this from the timeline of Elements 7. Does anyone know if this is possible and if so how to do it. Answers gratefully received. Roy

tom hardwick
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Re: Adobe Premiere Elements 7

Post by tom hardwick » Tue Feb 03, 2009 9:08 am

Elements 4 (which I'm presuming is little different to 7) allows you to simply click a tag when your timeline edit's complete and 'make DVD'. Is there a reason you don't do it this way rather than going out to your DVD recorder, Roy?

Roy

Re: Adobe Premiere Elements 7

Post by Roy » Tue Feb 03, 2009 4:33 pm

Tom. After a lot of frustration, I have found the tag to burn a DVD. It's not in the place I expected to find it. I'm used to clicking on File-export.- Movie-tape -print to video etc. On elements I find I have to click on share-Burn DVD. I have tried it. It's quick but the resultant image quality on the DVD is not Good. The picture is sharp ok but has a lot of noise on it. Wheras on 6.5, direct to recorder from Timeline is excellent results in all ways. I only had a try with elements 7 simply to work in HDV, which of course 6.5 wont handle. I now find that as my camcorder will convert the HDV to standard DV output. I van edit on 6.5 and get excellent quality DVD from the originally shot HDV. I have aquired a TV with a built in upscaler and by playing the DVD in it the quality of the standard DVD is enhanced greatly. I have now got Premiere Pro 2 on a specially built powerful computer just for HDV work. All I can do at the moment in HDV is to edit the original clips and put the complete video back on tape as HDV.. It means of course using the camcorder connected to the HD ready Television to view the video as shot in HDV. It looks good, but with the advent of Upscalers. I wonder if all the extra expense has been worth it. By the way PC World and Curry's don't stock Upscalers. Pc worlds says there's no demand and Curry's say there's no upscalers on the market. Thanks for your interest. Roy.

tom hardwick
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Re: Adobe Premiere Elements 7

Post by tom hardwick » Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:09 pm

I echo your thoughts about upscalers. Read the post started by Peter Stedman, 'Projectors'.

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Dave Watterson
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Re: Adobe Premiere Elements 7

Post by Dave Watterson » Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:11 pm

The "share burn" thing is an echo of the Apple way of naming processes !

It does seem strange that when Adobe bring out a PC product they adopt some Apple nomenclature. But then it has always seemed strange to me that Microsoft and Apple have persisted in using different names for the same thing over the years.

Dave

tom hardwick
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Re: Adobe Premiere Elements 7

Post by tom hardwick » Wed May 12, 2010 2:43 pm

Roy said:
PC World and Curry's don't stock Upscalers. Pc worlds says there's no demand and Curry's say there's no upscalers on the market.
Shows they're talking through their bums. Every HD-DVD and Blu-ray player sold automatically upscales DVDs they play, but only if they're connected HDMI to the TV or projector (and why wouldn't they be?)

I also have a Toshiba (standard def) DVD player that upscales beautifully. So much so that I too often find myself thinking why bother shooting hi-def footage? Well, the answer is futureproofing and image manipulation. You can use Mercalli image stabilisation on HDV and when downconverted to SD the image losses are hard to spot; the stabilisation sure isn't.

Also with HD footage you can 'zoom in', right down to 720 x 576 resolution, to correct in post, either giving you more telephoto or cutting out your visible microphone or something.

tom.

Roy1
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Re: Adobe Premiere Elements 7

Post by Roy1 » Wed May 12, 2010 4:16 pm

Hi Tom. Thanks for your rather belated comments. I have solved all my problems by using Sony Vegas Movie studio platinum 9 pro pack. It gives me the choice of editing on Adobe Pro2 and then placing the finished edit onto Vegas to burn a Blu-ray disc, or editing on the Vegas and burning the Blu-ray disc. At the moment I am using the first method as I am used to Adobe editing, until I have learnt enough about Vegas. I wonder if you can advise on my new dilemma. I am thinking of buying another multimedia projector which claims to be HD ready but has no HDMI input socket only a VGA input. The salesman tells me that using a RGB/RCA component to VGA connecting lead the projector will screen HD from the Blu-ray player. This means using the RCA RGB outputs on the player and connecting them to the VGA input of the projector which will output 1018. The seller claims that this is what he has been doing with his setup. My concern is whether the Player will upscale standard DVD when it is not connected via HDMI socketry. With my current set up I have successfully placed 30 minutes of HD onto a standard def. DVD-R disc, and the player recognises this as a Blu-ray disc and plays it as HD on an HD ready TV. Whether or not it will do the same when connected to the VGA input on the proposed projector I don't know.

tom hardwick
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Re: Adobe Premiere Elements 7

Post by tom hardwick » Wed May 12, 2010 4:27 pm

I don't know enough about projectors to advise, but there are IAC folk here and on the email forum that know all. Peter Kidman's one such man. I'm pretty sure that a projector can show 1920 x 1080 (the spec sheet will tell you) without having HDMI in, but why would it not be included? It raises my suspicions.

DVD players do need HDMI out if you want them to upscale, so I think if I were you I'd look for a projector that has HDMI in, the same as your TV has. In the latter's case it's not having to upscale the Blu-ray (H624 or MPEG2) from your DVD burn, it's already hi-def to start with, even though it's held on a 'standard def' DVD blank.

tom.

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